Straight Shirt 723

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Straight Shirt 723

18.05

Straight Shirt: Button-down, fingertip length shirt/jacket with deep armholes and full sleeves that taper from elbow and bunch at the wrist. Multi-sized XS-XL.

This is a very popular piece. A great alternative to a jacket. Its simplicity allows many fabric and design options.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Witty Knits
A dress that moves with you and always looks chic is a business traveler’s best friend. Christine Jonson Patterns 930 (XS-XL) not only achieves this goal, but also boasts special serger-speedy construction. The designer created this jewel neck, sleeveless, A-line dress pattern specifically to use with her own Lycra-blend fabrics. To render the dress seasonless (and air-condition-proof), top it with Christine Jonson Patterns 723 (XS-XL), a fingertip-length shirt-jacket with deep armholes and full sleeves that taper and “puddle” at the wrists.
Christine Jonson Patterns: Pattern #930 (dress) Pattern, #723 (shirt-jacket)
Christine Jonson Fabrics: #3806/Dark Olive (dress), #4812/Claret (dress inset & shirt-jacket) Fabric: 90% Cotton/10% LYCRA
— SewNews February 2002

Straight Shirt, #723, Christine Jonson Patterns
Reviewed by Kytrena Tuttle, Spring, TX

Simple styling is the key phrase in describing the Christine Jonson Straight Shirt. The button-up knit shirt with a collar and push-up sleeves looks great over slim pants. I was reluctant to try this pattern because it is “straight” and I am not. The shirt skims the body without being body hugging or oversized. The envelope description suggests using the shirt as a jacket, but I don’t feel there’s enough ease to wear it over anything bulkier than a tank top. Also, the sleeves aren’t as generous as described. The back of the pattern states clearly the measurements, yardage and notions needed.
Easy-to-follow instructions make this a perfect pattern for a beginning sewer. The layouts are clear. The pattern pieces are like commercial patterns and each size is well marked. Since her patterns are to be used with a cotton/LYCRA knit that she sells, general instructions for handling and sewing are included.
As I was reading the pattern, I couldn’t believe my eyes. It says, “Do not preshrink cotton/LYCRA fabric.” I have been given permission to cut before shrinking. I read further. Again, I was aghast. It says, “Do not press as you sew.” Oh, what fun—I can break the rules.
My shirt turned out well, even though I’m not accustomed to using my serger for anything except finishing seams. In lieu of a roller foot, which Christine suggests to control slippage when topstitching the knit, I successfully used a glue stick to glue down the facings and hems before topstitching. Also, it would be helpful if Christine printed the after-shrinkage garment measurements on the pattern so that we would have a point of reference for judging ease and alterations.
When I ordered the fabric for this pattern, I also ordered the straight leg pants pattern and fabric. They were easy (no side seams) and fit perfectly. Be sure to cut them long enough to accommodate the shrinkage.
— The Creative Machine, Summer 1999